NIH Blueprint: The Human Connectome Project

Q1 Data Release Reference

IMPORTANT: Before you begin to use HCP Data, please review the set of available HCP Data Use Terms, and follow the steps to accept the terms that apply to your research.

Introduction and overview

This document provides information and guidance on how to use the Quarter 1 (Q1) data released by the WU-Minn HCP consortium in February 2013.  Given the richness of the HCP datasets and their utility for a wide range of research purposes, it is important that potential users understand what data are in the current release, how the datasets are organized, how they can be accessed, and what’s in store for future quarterly releases...

HCP data sizes

The MRI images collected for each HCP subject are notably high in spatial resolution and (for fMRI) in temporal resolution as well.  Coupled with the long scan duration for each modality, the resultant image data files are very large. This “big data” is generally a good thing, enabling researchers to conduct types of data analyses that have never before been possible.  However, the sheer size of the imaging data generated by the HCP protocol (total Q1 release data ~2TB) requires some special considerations...

How to Access HCP data

Go to the HCP data home page at http://humanconnectome.org/data/. Here, you can get an overview of the Q1 data release, read the Open Access Data Use Terms, explore links to details of the HCP protocols, and access more useful resources for using HCP data...

MR Scanner and Other Hardware

All data in this Q1 release were acquired on a Siemens Skyra 3T scanner housed at Washington University in St. Louis.  The scanner has a customized SC72 gradient insert and a customized body transmitter coil with 56 cm bore size...

Summary of Imaging Protocols

Structural, fMRI, and dMRI acquisitions were collected over 4 total imaging sessions, each approximately 1 hour in duration.  Resting-state and task-fMRI data was collected in two sessions. Each session consisted of two resting-state acquisitions of approximately 15 minutes each, followed by task-fMRI acquisitions of varying durations...

Summary of Behavioral Measures

HCP Subjects undergo many behavioral tests that are part of the NIH Toolbox battery and several Non-Toolbox behavioral measures. The Q1 data release includes only Non-NIH Toolbox behavioral measures...

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)

A major effort has been made to establish consistent procedures for all aspects of data acquisition and data processing.  These are described in a set of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that are included in Appendix 4.  These SOPs provide a useful reference for investigators wanting to know more about exactly what was done...

Data in this release

76 healthy adult subjects in the age range 22 – 35 participated in the first quarter of data collection. These include 68 subjects with data from all or nearly all modalities, 3 with structural MRI scans and behavioral tests, and 5 with behavioral tests only...

Unprocessed data

Processed Data

Additionally processed group-average data

Task-fMRI files and protocol details

We assessed seven major domains that we think sample the diversity of neural systems that will be of interest to a wide range of individuals in the field, including: 1) visual, motion, somatosensory, and motor systems; 2) category specific representations; 3) working memory/cognitive control systems; 4) language processing (semantic and phonological processing); 5) social cognition (Theory of Mind); 6) relational processing; and 7) emotion processing...

Details of behavioral measures

We are collecting measures developed for the NIH Toolbox to assess several domainsNIH Toolbox behavioral measure data will be described in detail and included in future releases. NIH Toolbox measures we are collecting as part of the HCP include...

References

Appendices